Woodland Utensils (Underwood)

Elaine Bolt
£1,290
Woodland Utensils (Underwood) forms part of a collection of small ceramic ‘utensils’ and mixed media objects assembled and framed to form three-dimensional collages, made by ceramicist, Elaine Bolt. Elaine’s work is guided by a sense of narrative and steeped in the context of local surroundings. For this series of works, Elaine was inspired by the landscape of the Sussex Downs. She has combined found materials along with hand built porcelain and ceramic objects, blurring the boundaries between the made and found. The artwork is mounted on a board and then framed with stained beech wood without glass.


Material: Black oxide stained porcelain branch and spoon, found wood objects, white porcelain twig spoon and grasses, red wild clay twig and berries, white porcelain grasses, red stoneware branch, lichen, wire.
Dimensions:
cm: Width 40cm, Depth 4cm, Height 40cm
inches: Width 15.7in, Depth 1.6in, Height 15.7in
Care Instructions: Can be dusted by gently blowing or by using a compressed air can held away from frame
Out of stock

Process

The porcelain and ceramic pieces are individually hand built by Elaine, before being combined and arranged with the found materials. The pieces are then attached to the board using wire. Some of the porcelain pieces are coloured with oxides to achieve a range of tones, whilst others are made from locally dug clays. Found metal, wood, vintage brush bristle, thread and other materials are all used to form the compositions.
The Maker Elaine Bolt Ceramicist - South East England

Ceramic artist Elaine Bolt’s work is guided by a sense of narrative and steeped in the context of the local surroundings. An alumni of the Crafts Council’s Hothouse scheme, Elaine works with local clay and mixed-media to create pieces which aim to blur the boundaries between the made and the found. Elaine teaches and lectures in ceramics at various institutions, including her Brighton-based studio, and her work is often informed by the colours and tones found in the landscape of the South Downs.